Lawyer of the Year – Medical Malpractice Attorney Hawaii shares results from concussion study

Lawyer of the Year – Medical Malpractice Attorney Hawaii shares results from concussion study

Lawyer of the Year – Medical Malpractice Attorney Hawaii shares results from concussion study

Lawyer of the Year – Medical Malpractice Hawaii – and Best Lawyer Hawaii, Ian Mattoch, received a link to a New York Times article from neuropsychology expert, Claude Munday, Ph.D.

NY Times reporter Jeff Kleinfeb stated that a series of studies published yesterday in the Journal of Neurosurgery.  The study revealed that the forty-five men and women hockey players who sustained concussions during the 2011-2012 season had acute microstructural changes in their brains.  These changes were seen as inflammatory and white matter changes on imaging studies conducted before, during and after season to measure the effects of concussions on athletes.  Researchers concluded that the radiographic changes in the brain microstructure may reflect micro-hemorrhaging, neural injury, or other inflammatory responses due to the brain trauma.

“We’ve seen evidence of chronic injuries later in life from head trauma, and now, we’ve seen this in current players,” said Dr. Paul Echlin, an Ontario sports concussion specialist who conducted the study in collaboration with doctors from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and researchers from Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Western University of Canada.

All 45 players were given M.R.I. scans before and after the season. The 11 who received a concussion diagnosis during the season were given additional scans within 72 hours, two weeks and two months of the incident.

Researchers concluded that the imaging techniques used in the study might provide a model for monitoring acute and cumulative brain injury sustained by athletes.  The incidence of concussion observed in this study was 3-5 times higher than previously reported in medical literature.  This finding is consistent with other recent studies showing that concussion in hockey players occur more frequently than previously believed.

Echlin said further research was needed on larger populations of athletes in other contact and noncontact sports and on non-athletes to validate the results.  To read the complete article, click on the following link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/04/sports/hockey/study-finds-changes-in-brains-of-hockey-players-who-had-concussions.html?_r=0

   

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